Dr. Darrell C. Richardson founded the Memphis Science Fiction Association, was a member of First Fandom, served as Director of the National Fantasy Fan Federation, helped create MidSouthCon, was an ordained Baptist minister and, in his spare time, wrote 44 books about great men of fantasy and genre fiction such as Max Brand, Edgar Rice Burroughs and J. Allen St. John.

For more about Dr. Richardson check out this link:


I had the pleasure of meeting him on several occasions and still own a number of his books, all signed by the great man himself. In 1996 a group of fans founded the Darrell Awards in his honor, to promote literacy in the Mid-South.

On Saturday night, March 10, 2018, at about 6:38 PM, this incredibly prestigious award was given to me for my novella, A Night At The Quay, which appears in the full length book Sharp Steel or as a standalone. In the audience at the time were such SFF superstars as Mike Resnick, Steve Miller and Sharon Lee. Holy humbling, Batman!

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I see awards as matters of trust between the recipient and the judges. I am eternally grateful to those who selected Quay and will try not to let them down with my future work.

The earliest version of this story dates to 1979. It was read by many of my college professors back in the day and all but one hated it. Of course, they hated anything genre related. I wasn’t luck enough to get Dal Coger or Jack Beifuss as a teacher.

Anyway, I tinkered with the story and drew some illustrations for it up until the late 90’s, when I finally digitized it, copied it to a floppy disc and forgot about it. Then, in early 2017, I found the floppy.

My writing style had changed radically in the intervening decades, as had my ability to judge my own work. Plus, I’d forgotten most of the story. So I rewrote it and sent it to my awesome publisher, J. Gunnar Grey of Dingbat Publishing. She loved it as much as I did.

What I’ve always loved about this story is the interplay between the two heroes, Alden and Dexter, the evil wizard who really isn’t so evil, greedy hucksters, assassins, the misty seaport setting and a werebear who isn’t doesn’t change shape. Instead of the usual tropes I played with them and twisted them but still held true to the influences of my heroes, Robert E. Howard and Fritz Leiber.

Karf and Lef – Illustration by William Alan Webb

Sometimes a writer can’t believe they wrote something, and that’s how it is with this story and I. I’ve always said that writing makes me better than I really am, and this award proves it!

Cover for the novella version. Principal artwork by Shannon Ortberg, finishing artwork by William Alan Webb. Layout and typography by J. Gunnar Grey.